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Justin Bieber Responds to Racial Backlash, Says He’s No “White Savior”

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Justin Bieber knows what people out there are saying about him.

And now he has something to say about it.

The singer has come under a bit of fire for the track “MLK Interlude,” which is featured on his latest album, “Justice.”

This fire is based on Bieber’s skin color, combined with both the title of the song and the lyrics that comprise the song… which are taken from a real-life person and real-life events.

Justin Bieber Says Hello

While speaking in his first-ever Clubhouse room on Tuesday, the artist opened up about his new LP and explained why he chose to include Martin Luther King Jr. speech clips on the album.

“Being Canadian,… they didn’t teach us about Black history.

“It was just not a part of our education system,” Bieber said when asked about how he believes his music could play a role in social advocacy.

“I think for me, coming from Canada and being uneducated and making insensitive jokes when I was a kid and being insensitive and being honestly just a part of the problem because I just didn’t know better.”

Justin Bieber in 2020

Added the pop star:

“For me to have this platform to just share this raw moment of Martin Luther King in a time where he knew he was going to die for what he was standing up for.”

There actually is a complicated and interesting issue.

Is someone such as Bieber paying respect to the legendary civil rights activist and using his platform to try and make a difference?

Or is he exploiting one of the most respected and important figures in American history just to sell some music?

Hailey Baldwin and Justin Bieber Cuddle on the Beach

MLK’s words are featured on the track “MLK Interlude,” as well as the five-second intro to “2 Much,” the single that opens the album.

According to Billboard, Bieber used Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “But If Not” sermon for “MLK Interlude,” while the “2 Much” intro came from MLK’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail.”

The latter is one of the best-known pieces of writing of the 20th century.

Bieber and Bride

As part of his Clubhouse chat, Bieber responded to claims that he was “trying to be a white savior” by sampling Martin Luther King Jr’s speeches, noting that he decided to include MLK’s sermon to “amplify” the “incredibly, touching speech.”

“I was willing to go through as much hate by putting that on the album because I know there’s a bigger purpose,” Bieber said. “

I’m not trying to be a white savior. My heart is just to amplify Martin Luther King’s voice.”

Justin has often said he’s trying to evolve as a human being, following many years of acting like a spoiled, entitled brat.

mlk interlude

“I want to keep growing and learning about just all social injustices and what it like for me to be better, what it looks like for my friends to be better,” he continued.

“And I know I have a long way to go.”

Bieber announced his sixth album back in February, saying on Twitter that “my goal is to make music that will provide comfort, to make songs that people can relate to and connect to so they feel less alone.”

here is bieber

He added at the time:

“Suffering, injustice and pain can leave people feeling helpless [and] music is a great way of reminding each other that we aren’t alone” and “can be a way to relate to one another and connect with one another.”

As for the backlash against “MLK Interlude” and how it’s slotted next to the track, “Die For You,” which is about Bieber’s wife, Hailey?

Justin Bieber and Hailey Baldwin, Black and White on Vacation

“I love that when people are listening to my album, these conversations are coming up and they’re like, ‘Well, how is he going from Martin Luther King into a love song?'” Bieber said.

“I’m not trying to make a connection between me and Martin Luther King.

“That’s why I never try to talk about social injustice or I didn’t want to be the one to talk about it because I just have so much more learning to do.

“But I have this man who was ready to die and what he believed to be true.

“If I’m not willing to face some sort of ridicule or judgment of people wondering my motives or whatever that is, for me, it was a no brainer.”

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